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Diesel Heater: Fault Finding

Installing a diesel heater on your vehicle is one of the best investments you can make, as it provides remarkable benefits for you. Specifically, a diesel heater helps warm your car, making your car travel more enjoyable and comfortable no matter how cold the weather is.

However, your diesel heater will fail over time after many years of usage, no matter how good the quality is. It is best to regularly check the condition of your heater, like monitoring the diesel performance, to ensure that it still functions well.

If the heater starts on, blasts cold air for about 6 minutes, then fails to start and displays either E10 (Belief digital controller) or the red LED flashes continually with no pauses (Belief rotary controller) or Error 53 Eberspacher D2, there is a problem with the control.

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When this happens, there are two possible issues with this: either there is no power to the heater or an issue with the controller or heater ECU. If the second problem is, you should better look for an expert to address this. Meanwhile, if the issue is the first one, then try doing the following:

  1. Check to see if the fuse is in good working order. Take it out and either test it or replace it. The fuse should be positioned near your battery in the main cables.
  2. Examine all plugs and connections. Connections can become loose due to rough roads or the movement of other items you are carrying. Trace the heater’s wires to the battery. Examine to see if all of the connectors are closed or tight. Check to see if the electricity comes back on.
  3. Examine the plugs for any dislodged pins. The small metal pins in the plugs might sometimes push back, resulting in poor contact. Check if each wire running into each connector has a metal pin that is fully pushed forward in the plug.
  4. Disconnect the heater’s main loom plug. On 2.2kW and 4kW heaters, this is outside the heater, while on 2kW heaters, it is inside the top of the heater. Once removed, insert a multimeter probe into the main loom socket where the thick black and red or black and brown wires are placed to measure the voltage on the main supply wires. If there is no power, continue seeking a break.

If you are not confident about doing this yourself, you can seek professional help.

To learn more about heater services, visit Pure Diesel Power at www.puredieselpower.com/.

Read More: Buying A New Truck? Here’s Why You Should Go Diesel

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